Product Milestones

Company Milestones

1992

Nike publishes its first code of conduct for contract factories, setting standards on overtime work, compensation, forced labor, and health & safety.

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1995

Nike focuses on shifting from petroleum-derived solvents (pds) to water-based adhesives in footwear, reducing the use of solvents by 95% and helping to avoid exposing workers to harmful fumes.

1996

Nike is the first company to join the Apparel Industry Partnership (AIP) at President Clinton’s request, a model of collaboration between industry and other stakeholders. AIP later becomes the Fair Labor Association.

1997

Nike commits to fully phasing out SF6, a global warming gas used in air-sole cushioning units. Nike completes the phase out of all F-gases in Nike-branded footwear in 2006.

1998

At a historic address at the National Press Club, Nike co-founder and then CEO Phil Knight announces Nike's commitment to raising age standards in contract factories, adopting U.S. OSHA clean air standards, increasing factory monitoring and expanding education programs for workers.

1998

Nike begins the phase out of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), a material linked to environmental concerns, in footwear.

2000

Nike endorses principles of the UN global compact, a multi-sector initiative that embraces nine universal principles of human rights, labor rights and environmental practices.

2001

Nike is one of the first companies to publish a Corporate Responsibility Report, leveraging the early Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) framework and focusing on the environment, labor practices, community affairs, employees and engagement with stakeholders.

2001

With the full support of the board, Nike is one of the first companies to establish a board-level committee for corporate responsibility.

2002

Nike develops an environmentally-preferred rubber for footwear outsoles that contains 96% fewer toxins by weight than the original formulations.

2005

In a move towards greater industry transparency and collaboration, Nike paves the way as the first company in the industry to voluntarily disclose the names and locations of all contract factories producing Nike product.

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2005

Nike's European distribution center in Laakdal, Belgium, raises the bar for sustainable logistics. Six wind turbines and more than 4,000 solar panels supply enough power to run the facility solely off of energy credits, while natural air-conditioning systems and building design allow for reduced energy consumption. Nike’s European Headquarters in the Netherlands is also powered by 100 percent renewable energy credits.

2006

Nike's considered design ethos, a commitment to "sustainability without compromising performance," is born. The philosophy and tools encourage designers to make sustainable choices at the beginning of the design process.

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2008

Nike launches the AIR JORDAN XX3 - the most innovative shoe Nike has designed to-date, incorporating sustainability without sacrificing performance. Innovation was at the heart of the design which resulted in Nike developing a ground-breaking, water-based bonding process that allows the carbon fiber plate to be attached without the use of solvent-based cements. This is a first for Nike performance footwear.

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2008

Nike releases the Trash Talk - the first performance basketball shoe that gives a second life to waste from the factory floor. The shoe’s upper is pieced together from leather and synthetic leather waste from the factory floor using zig-zag stitching, the mid-sole uses scrap-ground foam from factory production and the outsole uses environmentally-preferred rubber.

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2009

The move from a CR function to the SB&I team reflects the evolution of Nike's CR strategy from a risk management, philanthropic and compliance model to a long-term strategy focused on innovation, collaboration, and transparency to prepare the company to thrive in a sustainable economy.

2009

Nike initiates the formation of a new coalition of consumer companies, Business for Innovative Climate and Energy Policy (BICEP), to advocate for strong U.S. climate and energy legislation and unlock innovation through collaboration.

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2009

Recognizing the importance of innovation partnerships for sustainable growth, Nike creates the SB&I "lab" with the mission of accelerating sustainable innovation through external partnerships and strategic investments.

2010

Nike introduces the most environmentally-friendly and technologically advanced footbal jerseys to date for national teams playing in South Africa. For the first time, all of the national teams sponsored by Nike - including Brazil, Portugal and the Netherlands - wore jerseys made entirely from recycled polyester, each one produced from up to eight recycled plastic bottles.

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2010

In an effort to increase transparency in the industry, Nike releases an interactive map featuring factory-level data and worker statistics.

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2011

Nike helps set a new standard of environmental performance for the global apparel and footwear industry with the release of a joint roadmap towards zero discharge of hazardous chemicals in the supply chain by 2020, and outlines actions being taken as a company toward the goal.

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2012

NIKE announces a strategic partnership with Dyecoo Textile Systems B.V., developer and builder of the first commercially available waterless textile dyeing machine, which significantly reduces water consumption, reduces energy use, requires no auxiliary chemicals, no need for drying, and makes the process twice as fast.

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2012

NIKE unveils its new factory rating system, the Manufacturing Index, which looks at a contract factory’s total performance, including how a factory approaches sustainability. This Index elevates labor and environmental performance alongside traditional supply chain measures of quality, cost and on-time delivery.

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2012

Nike releases its most innovative marathon singlet yet, made from recycled bottles and dyed without water, worn by Kenyan marathon world champion Abel Kirui.

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2012

Nike introduces the high-performance Nike Flyknit racer, the production of which significantly reduces waste because yarns and fabric variations are precisely engineered only where they are needed for a featherweight, formfitting and virtually seamless upper.

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2012

Demonstrating a commitment to a more transparent and sustainable future, Nike establishes new sustainability targets for 2015-2020 that elevate sustainable innovation within the company's business strategy. The goals are structured in two levels: continuous improvement targets to "Make today better" and broader innovation commitments to "Design the future."

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2013

Illustrating the power of collaboration, LAUNCH members NIKE, Inc., NASA, the U.S. Agency for International Development and the U.S. Department of State convene 150 materials specialists, designers, academics, manufacturers, entrepreneurs and NGOs for a systems innovation summit to catalyze action around the sustainability of materials and how they are made.

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2013

As part of its commitment to designing a better, more sustainable future, NIKE launches making — an app that helps designers and product creators make informed decisions about the environmental impacts of the materials they choose.

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The Future

A sustainable future requires evolving Nike’s business model to deliver profitable growth while designing the best performance products for athletes, while minimizing the environmental impact, using innovation to bring about positive change across the entire supply chain and continuing to listen to the voice of the worker.

NIKE’s made significant progress, but we know there is no finish line.